Lebanon Travel Photography

Lebanon Travel Photography – Beirut to Baalbek. In 2019 I travelled to Lebanon on assignment for the Tahoun Project doing cultural heritage documentation for Jabal Moussa.

These photographs are snippets and glimpses from the first two weeks of May, 2019. Best viewed on OMM Photography.

Beirut, Lebanon. May/05/2019. Around the flat. (Owen Murray © 2019/ommphoto.ca)

Beirut, Lebanon. May/05/2019. Around the flat. (Owen Murray © 2019/ommphoto.ca)

Beirut, Lebanon. May/05/2019. Around the flat. (Owen Murray © 2019/ommphoto.ca)

Beirut, Lebanon. May/05/2019. Around the flat. (Owen Murray © 2019/ommphoto.ca)

Beirut, Lebanon. May/05/2019. Around the flat. (Owen Murray © 2019/ommphoto.ca)

Jabal Moussa, Lebanon. May/02/2019. Orientation and reconaisance. (Owen Murray © 2019/ommphoto.ca)

Jabal Moussa, Lebanon. May/02/2019. Orientation and reconaisance. (Owen Murray © 2019/ommphoto.ca)

Beirut, Lebanon. May/05/2019. Around the flat. (Owen Murray © 2019/ommphoto.ca)

Beirut, Lebanon. May/05/2019. Around the flat. (Owen Murray © 2019/ommphoto.ca)

Beirut, Lebanon. May/05/2019. Around the flat. (Owen Murray © 2019/ommphoto.ca)

Jabal Moussa, Lebanon. May/02/2019. Orientation and reconaisance. (Owen Murray © 2019/ommphoto.ca)

Jabal Moussa, Lebanon. May/02/2019. Orientation and reconaisance. (Owen Murray © 2019/ommphoto.ca)

Baalbek, Lebanon. May/12/2019. Day trip to visit Baalbek. (Owen Murray © 2019/ommphoto.ca)

Baalbek, Lebanon. May/12/2019. Day trip to visit Baalbek. (Owen Murray © 2019/ommphoto.ca)

Baalbek, Lebanon. May/12/2019. Day trip to visit Baalbek. (Owen Murray © 2019/ommphoto.ca)

Baalbek, Lebanon. May/12/2019. Day trip to visit Baalbek. (Owen Murray © 2019/ommphoto.ca)

Baalbek, Lebanon. May/12/2019. Day trip to visit Baalbek. (Owen Murray © 2019/ommphoto.ca)

Baalbek, Lebanon. May/12/2019. Day trip to visit Baalbek. (Owen Murray © 2019/ommphoto.ca)

Baalbek, Lebanon. May/12/2019. Day trip to visit Baalbek. (Owen Murray © 2019/ommphoto.ca)

Baalbek, Lebanon. May/12/2019. Day trip to visit Baalbek. (Owen Murray © 2019/ommphoto.ca)

Baalbek, Lebanon. May/12/2019. Day trip to visit Baalbek. (Owen Murray © 2019/ommphoto.ca)

Baalbek, Lebanon. May/12/2019. Day trip to visit Baalbek. (Owen Murray © 2019/ommphoto.ca)

Baalbek, Lebanon. May/12/2019. Day trip to visit Baalbek. (Owen Murray © 2019/ommphoto.ca)

Baalbek, Lebanon. May/12/2019. Day trip to visit Baalbek. (Owen Murray © 2019/ommphoto.ca)

Baalbek, Lebanon. May/12/2019. Day trip to visit Baalbek. (Owen Murray © 2019/ommphoto.ca)

Baalbek, Lebanon. May/12/2019. Day trip to visit Baalbek. (Owen Murray © 2019/ommphoto.ca)

 

Northern Spain

A week along the north coast in Miengo & Santander, Spain. June 15-21st, 2018.

Fête de St.Noé

 

Fête de St.Noé – the early summer celebration of St.Noé in Auvillar, France. See photos from the 2018 festival from Francis Sohier as well as his work in Auvillar throughout the year!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lake Nasser

 

Ringing in the 2018 New Year on Lake Nasser with the woman who said yes! My fiancé: the amazing, talented and beautiful Colleen Kinder!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kisiskâciwani-Sîpiy

 

Paddling the North Saskatchewan from the Bighorn Dam into Emily Murphy Park in Edmonton. Trip notes and resource references below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A tried and true Alberta paddle, this North Saskatchewaner was a 10-day trip with Class II+/III rapids bowed by the efforts of Leroy Schulz, putting in just below the Big Horn Dam at the end of Lake Abraham and taking out at Emily Murphy Park in Edmonton. Roughly 450km in length, it combined four sections from Mark Lund’s Paddle Alberta trip notes: Nordegg to Rocky Mountain House, Rocky Mountain House to Drayton Valley, Drayton Valley to Devon, and Devon to Edmonton. Combined with the upper section of the river above Lake Abraham from Rampart Creek to Preacher’s Point and a portage around the Big Horn Dam, and one could just about paddle the Kisiskâciwani-Sîpiy from source origin into Pehonan (Edmonton), following in the footsteps of the fur trade through the traditional territories of the Stoney Nakoda, Alexis Nakoda Sioux, Paul First and Enoch Cree nations. No 1:42,000 topo maps from Natural Resource Canada’s Geogratis portal this time as maps for each of these four sections are easily obtained (for a fee) here.

 

Follow the signs and access below the Big Horn Dam making a left hand turn onto the Big Horn Dam road approximately 22km west of Nordegg off the David Thompson Highway (#11). Follow the wide gravel road 4km down to the river. There’s plenty of room to maneuver and informal camping abounds; the best part of the logistics of this trip is that there’s no shuttle – simply get dropped off! Minimal (one bar) cell phone coverage is possible from almost every point on the journey – text messages get through.

 

Beautiful scenery and wildlife abound on this paddle, and distinct paddling zones moving from Mountain to Foothill to Prairie are encountered as one progresses through the four segments of the trip. Class II+/III rapids can be present depending on flow rates and the lines chosen especially in the first two sections from Nordegg to Rocky and Rocky to Drayton, so reviewing maps and being aware of marked locations is recommended. That said, many of these larger rapids are forgiving and provide ample room for recovery; braided channels early on the first day just after the Big Horn Dam posed the greatest challenge and hazard.

 

The Western High Gate of Medinet Habu

What follows below is an in-depth version of a 2015/16 field report adapted as a short working paper and poster submitted to the Arqueologica 2.0 Congress on Archaeology, Computer Graphics, Cultural Heritage and Innovation. It is part of ongoing research and documentation efforts of The Epigraphic Survey/Chicago House from the University of Chicago’s Oriental Institute under the guidance of Ray Johnson & Jen Kimpton and in collaboration with Hilary McDonald.

INTRODUCTION & BACKGROUND

The Western High Gate of Medinet Habu is located in Luxor, Egypt, on the west bank of the Nile and is one of two fortified gates in the great girdle wall that surrounds the Medinet Habu temple complex. It was first investigated and recorded in 1931/32 by Uvo Hölscher during the 5th campaign of the University of Chicago’s Oriental Institute.

Unlike the east gate, whose stone architecture remains largely intact, the west gate was attacked towards the end of the 20th dynasty, with large blocks toppled from the upper courses of the structure and subsequently buried under rubble and debris. It was then likely razed to the ground along with portions of the adjoining girdle wall during the 21st – 24th dynasties and used as a stone quarry. As such, a few foundation blocks of the south tower are all that remain in situ of the stonework, though large sections of supporting mud brickwork are still in place. Conversely, the supporting mud brickwork of the east gate was destroyed during a ’clearing’ of the temple complex during the late 1800’s.

Although their dimensions differ, Hölscher’s excavation of the foundation of both gates revealed them to be of very similar construction — the western gate being slightly larger — and this, paired with an analysis and comparison of in situ east gate blocks with those excavated from the rubble and debris at the west gate allowed him to conclude that, “the west gate closely resembled the east gate in construction and surfaces intended for display” (Hölscher 1951). The two gates thus provide a sort of inverse impression of one another; the study of each allowing a better understanding of their whole appearance and function in antiquity.

The 3D modelling of the Western High Gate undertaken as part of the 2015/16 Epigraphic Survey Project (Chicago House) was a continuation of Hölscher’s explorations and conclusions, serving as the best means of thoroughly documenting the area before further excavations under the guidance of Oriental Institute researcher Jen Kimpton, and further research, publication and development of the area for tourism under Chicago House Director Ray Johnson.

TECHNIQUE & METHODOLOGY

Software: A number of different commercial and research based programs were discussed (Agisoft Photoscan, Pix4D, Mic Mac, Structure, 123D Catch, Datem) and two were selected for trial; Agisoft Photoscan and Pix4D. Agisoft Photoscan was chosen because of the ease of use, graphical user interface and accuracy of results. Before commencing the scan, selected areas were used to test the capabilities of the program and develop a work methodology allowing for a complete survey of the area in the time available and with the resources at hand.

Trial: The first trial was completed using a ladder, tripod and timer feature of the camera selected. Previous experience with photogrammetric techniques led to the use of a Nikon D700 and fixed 28mm F/2.8 lens. This initial trial was extremely promising; full and complete coverage of the area in question was completed in 1.5hrs. The subsequent trial incorporated fixed points taken with a total station as well as the use of known distances (scale calibration). This trial resulted in measurable results that were 99.5% accurate; +/- 0.5mm over an area 8m x 4m. This, too, was extremely encouraging and led to the continued use and integration of points taken with a total station throughout the model. At this point, it was thought that the accuracy of these models could be controlled and perhaps even improved by placing measurement points in the corners of said models, relative to the dimensional, or volumetric space being scanned, as well as on any prominent features contained within. The use of control points, subsequently referred to as ‘Chunk Points’, was — and will continue to be — a balance between enough points to allow for as precise results as possible, while at the same time not using so many as to be prohibitive to their survey and accurate recording. In total, 202 points were established over a spread of 21 different sections to help with the fidelity of the models.

Approach: In consultation with Jen Kimpton, the total area of the scan (approximately 1ha) was divided into 20 sections, with the addition of the House of Butehamon at the end. Holscher’s initial survey and excavations provided limited information on the mudbrick structures surrounding and supporting the Western High Gate Pylon in antiquity; the results of this 3D survey/scan were hoped to provide additional information and an improved understanding of those structures.

The survey commenced with the Central Axis, first West, then East, and then expanded outwards, with areas being chosen based on day, condition and availability. The numeric before the section, or chunk name indicates the order in which they were shot. Each section/chunk, took approximately a day to photograph, with some sections requiring more photographs depending on the intricacy of the features involved and variation in volumetric, or dimensional, space encountered.

1: West Axis                                                                                       2: East Axis

3: SE Structure                                                                                 4: South Tower Interior

5: NE Structure                                                                                 6: Foundation Pit of the North Tower

7: NE Structure, West End                                                               8: Base of the South Tower

9: South Chamber Entrance                                                           10: South Court

11: South Chamber                                                                          12: South Structure, East End

13: South Structure, West End                                                       14: South Chamber, West Wall

15: North Enclosure Wall                                                               16: South Enclosure Wall

17: The South Slope                                                                         18: The North Slope

19: West of Gate South                                                                     20: West of Gate North

APPLIED TECHNIQUE

From initial trial samples involving a ladder and tripod, a technique was adapted to use a 4m extendable wooden tripod (Hölscher era?) on which a Gitzo ball head and plate capable of rotation at any angle was mounted. The Nikon D700 was out fitted with a modified wireless remote trigger. Raiese Bedauwy Abd Allah, Mohammed Mahmoud, and Ahmed Abd el Haris proved invaluable in orchestrating this work, as their ideas, patience and strength allowed modification of equipment as well as the constant day to day maneuvering of camera-on-pole.

Due to the need for added height in the Southern sections and later, South Enclosure Wall, South Slope & North Enclosure Wall, a longer 7m aluminum pole was used in addition to the 4m Holscher-era wooden tripod. The 7m aluminum pole was later adopted wholesale for it’s light weight manoeuvrability. This aluminum pole mounted the Gitzo ball head to a Calmut lighting clamp bracket modified to accommodate the ball head and affixed to the pole at the desired height. Modifications to the wireless remote trigger system along with daily wear-and-tear led to the remote misfiring on multiple occasions; after replacing a 2 LE jack, the system functioned as originally intended.

When a height greater than 7m was required, two techniques were employed; the first experimented with two 7m aluminum poles clamped together with roughly 2-3 m overlap, resulting in a 11m length. This was quickly ruled out due to the feeling that with any sudden movements or gusts of wind, the poles would snap and break under their own weight, and was replaced by a 6m high aluminum scaffolding rig on which the 7m aluminum pole was placed, giving the equivalent reach of 13m from the ground.

Workflow, Pre-Photography: Before field photography of any section or chunk began, a series of chunk points were determined and nailed in place using either reflective tape or reinforced tinfoil plaques. These chunk points were labelled sequentially and placed in corner points and along the boundaries of each section, as well as on any prominent features within that section. The points were photographed and a written description noted for each to aid in their survey post photography. The section was also cleaned of any garbage and 3 rulers (2 x 50cm, 1 x 1m) used for scale calibration were placed, in varied locales within the dimensional space of that chunk.

Workflow, Photography: For any given chunk a series of 3 types of photos were taken; first Topos, second Overviews, and finally Details. Each type of photo included overlap (30%) between it and the next, and were shot sequentially moving in a consistent fashion to aid the program in alignment and tie point recognition. Photos were checked manually in field as needed to ascertain their quality.

Topos were shot at a height of 4m above ground with the camera angled looking straight down, flush, or parallel, to the ground. This cartographic perspective provided an easily aligned framework in which the other two types of photographs could be further inserted and aligned.

Overviews were shot with the pole positioned perpendicular to the ground but the camera inclined downwards at roughly a 45º angle, and taken just along, or outside, the borders delineating the section, looking inwards to capture the interior of that section. These overviews were taken at positions of 13m, 7m, 4m, and 2m as dictated by the height of the features the section contained. A final handheld pass of the section was also included in these photos with the camera positioned perpendicular to the ground, but parallel to any wall or block features. The perspective and positioning of these type of photos allowed the geometry of individual sections to be captured easily as well as providing a suitable degree of overlap between sections aiding in their ability to align with one another.

Details were taken of any features within the section with unusual or obtuse geometry (in relation to the ground) such as undercut mudbrick structures, oddly positioned block fragments, etc that could not be adequately captured by the series of standardized overview photographs. This meant that many details were taken from a low level looking up; camera positioned perpendicular to ground but inclined upwards at approximately 20º – 30º.

Workflow, Exposure & Settings: A variance in exposures was required depending on the position of the sun, angle of lens in regards to refraction of light from mudbrick surfaces, and areas of deep shadow. In general, photos on the Nikon D700 were taken at ISO 200, 350@f/11 or f/13. Areas where the camera frame was filled with shadow were adjusted and taken at 180@f/11 and 250@f/11.

*Note* As depth of field was important to accurate point recognition, measurement and positioning via the optics (in this case, a fixed 28mm lens) an f-stop below f/11 would have been unadvisable. With a 28mm lens @ f/11, focus could fall automatically as dictated by the features of the chunk without having to worry whether areas nearer or farther from the focus point would appear “in focus”.

Special attention was paid to the time of day and raking light in regards to prominent mudbrick wall features, and in several sections photos taken at different times of day (generally early morning/late afternoon) were combined so as to achieve the best possible lighting result for that section. In a similar vein, attention to shadow cast by the pole often dictated the manner of movement for the Topo type photographs (camera aligned to the East, moving East-West in strips) so as to avoid this cast shadow.

Workflow, Post-Process (Lightroom): Photos were shot in RAW format and catalogued and developed in Adobe Lightroom. Processing involved minor colour temperature calibration and major highlight and shadow recovery so as to ‘flatten’ the photo, making it have less contrast than the conditions in which it was shot, and show as much detail in shadow areas as possible. Processed photos were exported as high resolution jpegs and then imported in Agisoft Photoscan for construction of the 3D model.

*Note* Photoscan advices using a lossless TIFF format if issues are encountered with fringing — due to the number, and file size, of photos generated by the TIFF format, high resolution jpegs with the least amount of compression possible (setting of 12) were used instead.

Workflow, Model Assembly (Agisoft Photoscan): Agisoft Photoscan was installed on a late model 2013 Macbook Pro with a 2.7 GHz Intel Core i7 processor, 16 GB of RAM and NVIDIA GeForce GT 650M Graphics Card. All time time lengths indicated below are a result of these specifications. Faster processor/s, more RAM and advanced graphics cards will speed up the calculations and processing involved in model assembly.

The model of the Western High Gate was assembled in individual chunks; each chunk took approximately one day to photograph and after on-site photography, a “low resolution” model of the chunk was created to check that accurate and adequate coverage was provided by the sequence of photos taken. The process of assembling a section/chunk in Photoscan is relatively straightforward. After importing photos for a specific chunk, the photos were aligned, and common tie points between the images established. Depending on the number of photographs and resulting tie points, the alignment process was relatively quick; 1-2 mins for a series of 75 photos, 4-5 mins for a series of 250 – 300 photos. Alignment of chunk photos resulted in a sparse cloud visualization of these common tie points in space; relative to one another and the camera positions, (referred to as ‘camera stations’ in Photoscan) from which they were taken.

At this point, any non-aligned photos or sequences were reviewed. With most individual chunk models there were no problems with combining the different types of photos taken on site; Topos, Overviews and Details, however on occasion, and specifically when combining multiple chunks, a more specified build/alignment pattern was required. This involved importing and aligning a specific type of photo first, and then saving the results, before reintroducing other photo types and sequences which previously had been unable to align.

*Note* Building chunks independently and then aligning them wasn’t employed for this section of the survey; the resulting overall model of 3006 photos was built in one chunk.

From the aligned photos and sparse cloud visualization, a dense cloud of points (resulting in a similar LIDAR laser scan point cloud array) could be generated. The density of this dense cloud is determined by a series of 5 settings: Highest, High, Medium, Low and Lowest, that effectively control the number of points included in the dense cloud (resolution) via a sampling algorithm of the jpegs used to generate the model. A ‘low’ setting provided an effective dense cloud for generating a low resolution model and required only 10-15 mins to build.

Visualization of the dense cloud provides quite a photo realistic appearance as these points combine to form an image, in a very similar fashion to mechanical presses and/or inkjet printers (the Impressionists might be impressed). Dots on a at 2 dimensional surface are now points in 3 dimensional space, measured and aligned self referentially; both create the illusion of form.

By evaluating the dense cloud, any areas with sparse and inadequate coverage could be determined and re-photographed/sourced in the field. This evaluation technique proved essential in covering the highest points in the survey, a mudbrick wall atop the North and South Slopes.

It is important to note that up until this stage in the process the visual and aesthetic information conveyed via the photographs is of no importance — or rather, that the photographs are only aids in the accurate measurement and recording of points in space and the resulting geometry of the objects/terrain they cover. Instead of laser, light is used as means of measurement; thus until this stage in the process, the camera is merely a tool for accurately observing and recording distance and ascertaining relative position.

Following evaluation, the dense cloud was trimmed and cleaned up using an assortment of Photoscan selection tools to accurately reflect the boundaries of the chunk in question (3 dimensional cropping). From the cropped dense cloud, a mesh model measured in tile faces was generated — a series of polygon shapes drawn from various points in the dense cloud — to accurately reflect the surface geometry of the section. As with the dense cloud, using a low setting with relatively few tile faces (20,000 – 30,000) allowed this model to generate quickly (2-3 mins).

After mesh generation the same series of photos used for measuring distance were used to create texture, and it is at this point that the beauty of the photogrammetry process reveals itself. The visual and aesthetic qualities conveyed via the photographs are now skinned onto the model of measurements provided by them, resulting not only in an accurate spatial and geometric fidelity but accurate visual reference, too.

The then textured low resolution model was exported as an interactive Adobe PDF, available to anyone with the free Adobe PDF reader. The generation of these low resolution models proved helpful not only for quality control but as a means of quickly sharing the results of the survey as it progressed.

Experimentation with various presentation and visualization techniques is an active area of interest and Sketchfab’s model viewing, VR and embed options have proved invaluable. Future seasons will explore the use of a variety of programs: MeshLab, Blender, Z-Brush, CapturingReality and CloudCompare.

DISCUSSION

After a majority of the sections had been photographed, it was pointed out that a margin of error could be introduced into each section model as well as the overall model by including total station survey points. This stands to reason, as the accuracy of the measurements are only as accurate as the surveyor taking them — and in some cases, chunk points established on difficult to obtain corners and features would result in a margin of error greater than the normal +/- 0.5mm. A control test of this concept was conducted on section 15, as it provided a good representation of the terrain encountered within the overall west gate area.

Model 15 was assembled 3 times; first using a combination of 14 surveyed chunk points for that section, along with scale bar calibration of three rulers (2 x 50cm, 1 x 1m), the second time using just the 14 surveyed chunk points for that section, and the third time using just the scale bar calibration of three rulers. The distance between 8 points in each of the models was measured and the 3 different models were compared against one another, as well as against the same points measured independent of Photoscan, in Autocad, as well as against the distance ground truthed by hand using a tape measure. 

Although it was initially thought the inclusion of chunk point total station measurements would improve the accuracy of the section 15 model, it appears this is not the case, with the scale bar calibration model having a slight edge over both combined scale bar and chunk point model, as well as just the chunk point model.

Regardless of model assembly method, it would appear that measurements within a vertical dimension lose accuracy over a certain degree. It seems that measurements over a 45º angle of inclination are inaccurate at approximately 1% of the total distance measured, whereas those ≤ 45º have an inaccuracy of only 0.1 – 0.2% of the total distance measured. One interpretation of this data is that the placement of vertically aligned scale bars in a ‘z’ plane — and the resulting number of projections of those points within the model — were not numerous enough to ensure the same level of accuracy as those within ‘x’ and ‘y’ planes. Trials in subsequent field seasons and surveys will be conducted to test this premise.

Since preparing and recording chunk points within the context of each section is/was time consuming, and the results are negligible between this method and scale bar calibration, subsequent seasons and model assemblies will rely solely on scale bar calibration. Total station survey points will be used, though only in accurately georeferencing the finished model and positioning it within a global context.

Overall, despite the inability to use UAV technology, the camera mast system and photogrammetric approach utilizing Agisoft Photoscan delivered results that were accurate, resulting in a model agreeable to all involved. The use of these 3D modelling and documentation techniques will continue in future seasons, incorporating and updating Hölscher’s initial survey.

 

Vancouver in Spring

 

Vancouver in Spring, Herzog in mind. Three days in May: street photography offerings from a YVR spring sojourn and participation in the Capture Photography Festival, all with a nod of the head to Fred Herzog and his seminal work in documentary/art photography of Vancouver.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

England, Ireland & Scotland

 

Travels through the UK visiting friends and family: London, Doncaster, Waterford, The Cliffs of Moher, The Burren, Galway, Menstrie, Stirling & The Trossachs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Boulder Bouquet

 

Grand Lake moose and a virtual bouquet collected while hiking in Boulder, Colorado.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sundown

 

On the banks of the Nile with Marie, Antoine, Noe, Axel, Nico & Marion.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

YEG Pride Parade

 

Edmonton’s 2016 Pride Parade celebrations.

 

Canada, Edmonton. Jun/04/2016. Pride Parade.

 

Canada, Edmonton. Jun/04/2016. Pride Parade.

 

Canada, Edmonton. Jun/04/2016. Pride Parade.

 

Canada, Edmonton. Jun/04/2016. Pride Parade.

 

Canada, Edmonton. Jun/04/2016. Pride Parade.

 

Canada, Edmonton. Jun/04/2016. Pride Parade.

 

Canada, Edmonton. Jun/04/2016. Pride Parade.

 

Canada, Edmonton. Jun/04/2016. Pride Parade.

 

Canada, Edmonton. Jun/04/2016. Pride Parade.

 

Canada, Edmonton. Jun/04/2016. Pride Parade.

 

Canada, Edmonton. Jun/04/2016. Pride Parade.

 

Canada, Edmonton. Jun/04/2016. Pride Parade.

 

Canada, Edmonton. Jun/04/2016. Pride Parade.

 

Canada, Edmonton. Jun/04/2016. Pride Parade.

 

Canada, Edmonton. Jun/04/2016. Pride Parade.

 

Canada, Edmonton. Jun/04/2016. Pride Parade.

 

Canada, Edmonton. Jun/04/2016. Pride Parade.

 

Canada, Edmonton. Jun/04/2016. Pride Parade.

 

Canada, Edmonton. Jun/04/2016. Pride Parade.

 

Canada, Edmonton. Jun/04/2016. Pride Parade.

 

Canada, Edmonton. Jun/04/2016. Pride Parade.

 

Canada, Edmonton. Jun/04/2016. Pride Parade.

 

Canada, Edmonton. Jun/04/2016. Pride Parade.

 

Canada, Edmonton. Jun/04/2016. Pride Parade.

 

Canada, Edmonton. Jun/04/2016. Pride Parade.

 

Canada, Edmonton. Jun/04/2016. Pride Parade.

 

Canada, Edmonton. Jun/04/2016. Pride Parade.

 

Canada, Edmonton. Jun/04/2016. Pride Parade.

 

Canada, Edmonton. Jun/04/2016. Pride Parade.

 

Canada, Edmonton. Jun/04/2016. Pride Parade.

 

Canada, Edmonton. Jun/04/2016. Pride Parade.

 

Canada, Edmonton. Jun/04/2016. Pride Parade.

Old Man River

 

Paddling the Old Man River from Monarch (Highway 3A) to Taber (Highway 36). Trip notes, resource references and maps below.

 

Canada, Old Man River. May 15th - 19th, 2016.

 

Canada, Old Man River. May 15th - 19th, 2016.

 

Canada, Old Man River. May 15th - 19th, 2016.

 

Canada, Old Man River. May 15th - 19th, 2016.

 

Canada, Old Man River. May 15th - 19th, 2016.

 

Canada, Old Man River. May 15th - 19th, 2016.

 

Canada, Old Man River. May 15th - 19th, 2016.

 

Canada, Old Man River. May 15th - 19th, 2016.

 

Canada, Old Man River. May 15th - 19th, 2016.

 

Canada, Old Man River. May 15th - 19th, 2016.

 

If you’re looking for a classic southern Alberta paddle, the Old Man River certainly fits the bill; an overall grade I river suitable for Novice to Intermediate paddlers depending on flow. This trip was an abridged 4.5 day (166km) paddle adapted from Mark Lund’s Paddle Alberta trip notes which are an invaluable resource – excellent for planning and handy to have along for reference on route. NTS map references are provided in the document but if you’re interested in this specific stretch – put in at Monarch (Highway 3A) with a take out at the Highway 36 Bridge – feel free to use these. They’re 1:42,000 topo maps from Natural Resource Canada’s Geogratis portal (2016) assembled into three tabloid size documents, that when printed and laminated to 10mm thickness, are not only impermeable navigational aids, but make excellent cutting boards and placemats after the fact.

 

The car ferry from the Highway 36 bridge to Highway 3A took approximately an 1hr, making a 2hr roundtrip that was easily done. Access to the put in off Highway 3A is straightforward and on the right just after you’re crossed the bridge, if you’re headed southwest on 3A (coming from Lethbridge). There’s plenty of room to maneuver and lots of places to leave a vehicle. Highway 36 is relatively straightforward as well; access is on the left if you’re headed south (towards Taber) just after crossing the bridge, however a barbwire fence 100m from the river makes things trickier and requires canoes and gear to be hauled under/over on take out. And if you’re planning on leaving a vehicle at the Highway 36 bridge, or any other suitable take out along the way for longer than 48hrs, it would be wise to get in touch with the local RCMP detachment (in this case, Taber) beforehand and notify them of your plans.

 

Overall there’s beautiful scenery and lots of wildlife along this paddle, with the current going through a familiar ebb and flow – picking up in the twists and turns and then dumping out into what could be confused with lake paddling at other points. Though there isn’t much above class I, there are a few sections that depending on flow can/could prove tricky. It’s a good section to practice reading, as making heads-up, informed choices in advance can save hauling one’s canoe over rocky shallow sections and avoiding standing rocks, while misreading is less likely to end in dire circumstances, just hauling one’s canoe over rocky shallow sections and bumping into standing rocks.

 

Nuit Blanche

Canada, Edmonton. Sept/26/2015. Nuit Blanche

 

Canada, Edmonton. Sept/26/2015. Nuit Blanche

 

Canada, Edmonton. Sept/26/2015. Nuit Blanche

 

Canada, Edmonton. Sept/26/2015. Nuit Blanche

 

Canada, Edmonton. Sept/26/2015. Nuit Blanche

 

Canada, Edmonton. Sept/26/2015. Nuit Blanche

 

Canada, Edmonton. Sept/26/2015. Nuit Blanche

 

Canada, Edmonton. Sept/26/2015. Nuit Blanche

 

Canada, Edmonton. Sept/26/2015. Nuit Blanche

 

Canada, Edmonton. Sept/26/2015. Nuit Blanche

France

France, Dordognes. Aug/21/2015. David & Sonja's House.

 

France, Dordognes. Aug/21/2015. David & Sonja's House.

 

fr.dordognes_charreaux.082115_OMM9196

 

France, Dordognes. Aug/21/2015. David & Sonja's House.

 

France, Dordognes. Aug/21/2015. David & Sonja's House.

 

France, Dordognes. Aug/22/2015. David & Sonja's House. Chateau Decharreaux.

 

France, Dordognes. Aug/21/2015. David & Sonja's House.

 

France, Dordognes. Aug/21/2015. David & Sonja's House.

 

France, Dordognes. Aug/20/2015. David & Sonja's House.

 

France, Dordognes. Aug/20/2015. David & Sonja's House.

 

France, Dordognes. Aug/21/2015. David & Sonja's House.

 

France, Dordognes. Aug/22/2015. David & Sonja's House. Chateau Decharreaux.

 

France, Dordognes. Aug/20/2015. David & Sonja's House.

 

France, Dordognes. Aug/21/2015. David & Sonja's House.

 

France, Dordognes. Aug/21/2015. David & Sonja's House.

 

France, Dordognes. Aug/20/2015. David & Sonja's House.

 

France, Dordognes. Aug/21/2015. David & Sonja's House.

 

France, Dordognes. Aug/20/2015. David & Sonja's House.

 

France, Dordognes. Aug/21/2015. David & Sonja's House.

 

France, Dordognes. Aug/21/2015. David & Sonja's House.

 

France, Dordognes. Aug/21/2015. David & Sonja's House.

 

France, Dordognes. Aug/21/2015. David & Sonja's House.

 

France, Dordognes. Aug/21/2015. David & Sonja's House.

 

France, Dordognes. Aug/21/2015. David & Sonja's House.

 

France, Dordognes. Aug/21/2015. David & Sonja's House.

 

France, Dordognes. Aug/21/2015. David & Sonja's House.

 

France, Dordognes. Aug/21/2015. David & Sonja's House.

 

France, Dordognes. Aug/22/2015. David & Sonja's House. Chateau Decharreaux.

 

France, Dordognes. Aug/22/2015. David & Sonja's House. Chateau Decharreaux.

 

France, Dordognes. Aug/21/2015. David & Sonja's House.

 

France, Forcalquier. Aug/27/2015.

 

France, Forcalquier. Aug/27/2015.

 

France, Forcalquier. Aug/27/2015.

 

France, Lyon. Aug/29/2015.

 

France, Lyon. Aug/29/2015.

 

France, Lyon. Aug/29/2015.

 

France, Lyon. Aug/29/2015.

 

France, Lyon. Aug/29/2015.

 

France, Lyon. Aug/29/2015.

 

France, Lyon. Aug/29/2015.

 

France, Lyon. Aug/29/2015.

 

France, Lyon. Aug/29/2015.

 

France, Lyon. Aug/29/2015.

 

France, Lyon. Aug/29/2015.

 

France, Lyon. Aug/29/2015.

 

France, Lyon. Aug/29/2015.

 

France, Lyon. Aug/29/2015.

 

 

France, Lyon. Aug/29/2015.

 

France, Lyon. Aug/29/2015.

 

France, Lyon. Aug/29/2015.

 

France, Lyon. Aug/29/2015.

 

France, Lyon. Aug/30/2015. Gallo-Romain Museum.

 

France, Lyon. Aug/30/2015. Gallo-Romain Museum.

 

France, Lyon. Aug/30/2015. Gallo-Romain Museum.

 

France, Lisieux. Aug/31/2015. Basilica of Saint Thérèse.

 

France, Lisieux. Aug/31/2015. Basilica of Saint Thérèse.

 

France, Etretat. Sept/02/2015.

 

France, Etretat. Sept/02/2015.

 

France, Etretat. Sept/02/2015.

 

France, Etretat. Sept/02/2015.

 

France, Etretat. Sept/02/2015.

 

France, Etretat. Sept/02/2015.

 

France, Etretat. Sept/02/2015.

 

France, Etretat. Sept/02/2015.

 

France, Etretat. Sept/02/2015.

 

France, Etretat. Sept/02/2015.

 

France, Etretat. Sept/02/2015.

 

France, Etretat. Sept/02/2015.

 

France, Honfleur. Sept/02/2015.

 

France, Honfleur. Sept/02/2015.

 

France, Honfleur. Sept/02/2015.

 

France, Honfleur. Sept/02/2015.

 

France, Honfleur. Sept/02/2015.

 

France, Honfleur. Sept/02/2015.

 

France, Caen. Sept/03/2015.

 

France, Caen. Sept/03/2015.

 

France, Caen. Sept/03/2015.

 

France, Cormeilles. Sept/03/2015.

 

France, Paris. Sept/05/2015.

North Saskatchewan

 

Paddling the North Saskatchewan from Rampart Creek to Preacher’s point, with a scramble up Whirlpool Ridge.

 

Canada, North Saskatchew. June/25/2015. Rampart Creek - Preacher's Point.

 

Canada, North Saskatchew. June/25/2015. Rampart Creek - Preacher's Point.

 

Canada, North Saskatchew. June/25/2015. Rampart Creek - Preacher's Point.

 

Canada, North Saskatchew. June/25/2015. Rampart Creek - Preacher's Point.

 

Canada, North Saskatchew. June/25/2015. Rampart Creek - Preacher's Point.

 

Canada, North Saskatchew. June/25/2015. Rampart Creek - Preacher's Point.

 

Canada, North Saskatchew. June/25/2015. Rampart Creek - Preacher's Point.

 

Canada, North Saskatchew. June/25/2015. Rampart Creek - Preacher's Point.

 

Canada, North Saskatchew. June/25/2015. Rampart Creek - Preacher's Point.

 

Canada, North Saskatchew. June/25/2015. Rampart Creek - Preacher's Point.

 

Canada, North Saskatchew. June/25/2015. Rampart Creek - Preacher's Point.

 

Canada, North Saskatchew. June/25/2015. Rampart Creek - Preacher's Point.

 

Canada, North Saskatchew. June/25/2015. Rampart Creek - Preacher's Point.

 

Canada, North Saskatchew. June/25/2015. Rampart Creek - Preacher's Point.

 

Canada, North Saskatchew. June/25/2015. Rampart Creek - Preacher's Point.

 

Canada, North Saskatchew. June/25/2015. Rampart Creek - Preacher's Point.

 

Canada, North Saskatchew. June/25/2015. Rampart Creek - Preacher's Point.

 

Canada, North Saskatchewan. June/26/2015. Rampart Creek - Preacher's Point.

 

Canada, North Saskatchewan. June/26/2015. Rampart Creek - Preacher's Point.

 

Canada, North Saskatchewan. June/26/2015. Rampart Creek - Preacher's Point.

 

Canada, North Saskatchewan. June/26/2015. Rampart Creek - Preacher's Point.

 

Canada, North Saskatchewan. June/26/2015. Rampart Creek - Preacher's Point.

 

Canada, North Saskatchewan. June/26/2015. Rampart Creek - Preacher's Point.

 

Canada, North Saskatchewan. June/26/2015. Rampart Creek - Preacher's Point.

 

Canada, North Saskatchewan. June/26/2015. Rampart Creek - Preacher's Point.

 

Canada, North Saskatchewan. June/26/2015. Rampart Creek - Preacher's Point.

 

Canada, North Saskatchewan. June/26/2015. Rampart Creek - Preacher's Point.

 

Canada, North Saskatchewan. June/26/2015. Rampart Creek - Preacher's Point.

 

Canada, North Saskatchewan. June/26/2015. Rampart Creek - Preacher's Point.

 

Canada, North Saskatchewan. June/26/2015. Rampart Creek - Preacher's Point.

 

Canada, North Saskatchewan. June/27/2015. Whirlpool Ridge.

 

Canada, North Saskatchewan. June/27/2015. Whirlpool Ridge.

 

Canada, North Saskatchewan. June/27/2015. Whirlpool Ridge.

 

Canada, North Saskatchewan. June/27/2015. Whirlpool Ridge.

 

Canada, North Saskatchewan. June/27/2015. Whirlpool Ridge.

 

Canada, North Saskatchewan. June/27/2015. Whirlpool Ridge.

 

Canada, North Saskatchewan. June/27/2015. Whirlpool Ridge.

 

Canada, North Saskatchewan. June/27/2015. Whirlpool Ridge.

 

Canada, North Saskatchewan. June/27/2015. Whirlpool Ridge.

 

Canada, North Saskatchewan. June/27/2015. Whirlpool Ridge.

 

Canada, North Saskatchewan. June/27/2015. Whirlpool Ridge.

Japan

 

The first time back in 8 years after living and working in Japan as part of the JET Programme. I’m not sure how one composes a love letter to a country; whether it’s even possible to do so, not to mention wise. But in that light, I don’t think I’ve ever gotten over Japan, and I doubt I ever will. Three weeks for eight years.

 

言葉は日本気持ちについてちゃんと表現しかたはできません。写真はたりるかな?

 

Japan, Kumagaya. Apr/10/2015.

 

Japan, Kumagaya. Apr/10/2015.

 

Japan, Kumagaya. Apr/10/2015.

 

Japan, Kumagaya. Apr/10/2015.

 

Japan, Kumagaya. Apr/10/2015.

 

Japan, Kawagoe. Apr/11/2015. Koedo.

 

Japan, Kawagoe. Apr/11/2015. Koedo.

 

Japan, Kawagoe. Apr/11/2015. Koedo.

 

Japan, Kawagoe. Apr/11/2015. Koedo.

 

Japan, Kawagoe. Apr/11/2015. Koedo.

 

Japan, Kawagoe. Apr/11/2015. Koedo.

 

Japan, Kawagoe. Apr/11/2015. Koedo.

 

Japan, Kawagoe. Apr/11/2015. Kitain Temple.

 

Japan, Kawagoe. Apr/11/2015. Kitain Temple.

 

Japan, Kawagoe. Apr/11/2015. Kitain Temple.

 

Japan, Kawagoe. Apr/11/2015. Kitain Temple.

 

Japan, Kawagoe. Apr/11/2015. Kitain Temple.

 

Japan, Toyama. Apr/12/2015. Cherry Blossoms in Osawano and Ohyama.

 

Japan, Toyama. Apr/14/2015. Cherry Blossoms in Ohyama.

 

Japan, Toyama. Apr/12/2015. Cherry Blossoms in Osawano and Ohyama.

 

Japan, Takaoka. Apr/14/2015. Daibutsu Buddha and Kaiwo Maru.

 

Japan, Takaoka. Apr/14/2015. Zuiryuji Temple.

 

Japan, Takaoka. Apr/14/2015. Zuiryuji Temple.

 

Japan, Takaoka. Apr/14/2015. Zuiryuji Temple.

 

Japan, Takaoka. Apr/14/2015. Zuiryuji Temple.

 

Japan, Takaoka. Apr/14/2015. Zuiryuji Temple.

 

Japan, Takaoka. Apr/14/2015. Zuiryuji Temple.

 

Japan, Kyoto. Apr/15/2015. Fushimi Inari.

 

Japan, Kyoto. Apr/15/2015. Fushimi Inari.

 

Japan, Kyoto. Apr/15/2015. Fushimi Inari.

 

Japan, Kyoto. Apr/16/2015. Gion District, Kiyomizu-dera walk.

 

Japan, Kyoto. Apr/16/2015. Gion District, Kiyomizu-dera walk.

 

Japan, Kyoto. Apr/16/2015. Gion District, Kiyomizu-dera walk.

 

Japan, Kyoto. Apr/16/2015. Gion District, Kiyomizu-dera walk.

 

Japan, Kyoto. Apr/16/2015. Gion District, Kiyomizu-dera walk.

 

Japan, Kyoto. Apr/16/2015. Gion District, Ryozen, Kwan-on.

 

Japan, Kyoto. Apr/16/2015. Gion District, Ryozen, Kwan-on.

 

Japan, Kyoto. Apr/16/2015. Gion District, Ryozen, Kwan-on.

 

Japan, Kyoto. Apr/16/2015. Gion District walk. Kodaiji Temple, Maruyama Park.

 

Japan, Kyoto. Apr/16/2015. Gion District walk. Kodaiji Temple, Maruyama Park.

 

Japan, Kyoto. Apr/16/2015. Gion District walk. Kodaiji Temple, Maruyama Park.

 

Japan, Kyoto. Apr/16/2015. Gion District walk. Kodaiji Temple, Maruyama Park.

 

Japan, Kyoto. Apr/16/2015. Gion District walk. Kodaiji Temple, Maruyama Park.

 

Japan, Kyoto. Apr/16/2015. Gion District walk. Choraku-ji Temple and environs.

 

Japan, Kyoto. Apr/16/2015. Gion District walk. Choraku-ji Temple and environs.

 

Japan, Kyoto. Apr/16/2015. Gion District walk. Choraku-ji Temple and environs.

 

Japan, Kyoto. Apr/16/2015. Gion District walk. Choraku-ji Temple and environs.

 

Japan, Kyoto. Apr/16/2015. Gion District walk. Choraku-ji Temple and environs.

 

Japan, Kyoto. Apr/16/2015. Gion District walk. Choraku-ji Temple and environs.

 

Japan, Kyoto. Apr/16/2015. Gion District walk. Choraku-ji Temple and environs.

 

Japan, Kyoto. Apr/16/2015. Gion District walk. Choraku-ji Temple and environs.

 

Japan, Mie. Apr/17/2015. Ise Jingu Shrine.

 

Japan, Mie. Apr/17/2015. Ise Jingu Shrine.

 

Japan, Mie. Apr/17/2015. Ise Jingu Shrine.

 

Japan, Mie. Apr/17/2015. Ise Jingu Shrine.

 

Japan, Mie. Apr/17/2015. Ise Jingu Shrine.

 

Japan, Mie. Apr/17/2015. Ise Jingu Shrine.

 

Japan, Mie. Apr/17/2015. Ise Jingu Shrine.

 

Japan, Mie. Apr/17/2015. Ise Jingu Shrine.

 

Japan, Mie. Apr/17/2015. Ujinakanokiricho.

 

Japan, Mie. Apr/17/2015. Ujinakanokiricho.

 

Japan, Mie. Apr/17/2015. Ujinakanokiricho.

 

Japan, Mie. Apr/17/2015. Ujinakanokiricho.

 

Japan, Mie. Apr/17/2015. Ujinakanokiricho.

 

Japan, Mie. Apr/18/2015. Kumano Kodo. Furusato - Minose.

 

Japan, Mie. Apr/18/2015. Kumano Kodo. Furusato - Minose.

 

Japan, Mie. Apr/18/2015. Kumano Kodo. Furusato - Minose.

 

Japan, Mie. Apr/18/2015. Kumano Kodo. Furusato - Minose.

 

Japan, Mie. Apr/18/2015. Kumano Kodo. Furusato - Minose.

 

Japan, Mie. Apr/18/2015. Kumano Kodo. Furusato - Minose.

 

Japan, Mie. Apr/18/2015. Kumano Kodo. Furusato - Minose.

 

Japan, Mie. Apr/18/2015. Kumano Kodo. Furusato - Minose.

 

Japan, Mie. Apr/18/2015. Kumano Kodo. Furusato - Minose.

 

Japan, Mie. Apr/18/2015. Kumano Kodo. Furusato - Minose.

 

Japan, Mie. Apr/18/2015. Kumano Kodo. Furusato - Minose.

 

Japan, Mie. Apr/18/2015. Kumano Kodo. Furusato - Minose.

 

Japan, Mie. Apr/19/2015. Kumano Kodo. Kata - Niigishima - Atashika.

 

Japan, Mie. Apr/19/2015. Kumano Kodo. Kata - Niigishima - Atashika.

 

 

Japan, Mie. Apr/19/2015. Kumano Kodo. Kata - Niigishima - Atashika.

 

Japan, Mie. Apr/19/2015. Kumano Kodo. Kata - Niigishima - Atashika.

 

Japan, Mie. Apr/19/2015. Kumano Kodo. Kata - Niigishima - Atashika.

 

Japan, Mie. Apr/19/2015. Kumano Kodo. Kata - Niigishima - Atashika.

 

Japan, Mie. Apr/19/2015. Kumano Kodo. Kata - Niigishima - Atashika.

 

Japan, Mie. Apr/19/2015. Kumano Kodo. Kata - Niigishima - Atashika.

 

Japan, Mie. Apr/19/2015. Kumano Kodo. Kata - Niigishima - Atashika.

 

Japan, Mie. Apr/19/2015. Kumano Kodo. Kata - Niigishima - Atashika.

 

Japan, Mie. Apr/19/2015. Kumano Kodo. Kata - Niigishima - Atashika.

 

Japan, Mie. Apr/19/2015. Kumano Kodo. Kata - Niigishima - Atashika.

 

Japan, Mie. Apr/20/2015. Kiikatsura. Nachi Taisha Shrine and Nachisan Seiganto-ji Temple

 

Japan, Mie. Apr/20/2015. Kiikatsura. Nachi Taisha Shrine and Nachisan Seiganto-ji Temple

 

Japan, Mie. Apr/20/2015. Kiikatsura. Nachi Taisha Shrine and Nachisan Seiganto-ji Temple

 

Japan, Mie. Apr/20/2015. Kiikatsura. Nachi Taisha Shrine and Nachisan Seiganto-ji Temple

 

Japan, Mie. Apr/20/2015. Kiikatsura. Nachi Taisha Shrine and Nachisan Seiganto-ji Temple

 

Japan, Kochi. Apr/22/2015. Makino Botanical Garden.

 

Japan, Kochi. Apr/22/2015. Makino Botanical Garden.

 

Japan, Kochi. Apr/22/2015. Makino Botanical Garden.

 

Japan, Kochi. Apr/22/2015. Makino Botanical Garden.

 

Japan, Kochi. Apr/22/2015. Makino Botanical Garden.

 

Japan, Kochi. Apr/22/2015. Makino Botanical Garden.

 

Japan, Kochi. Apr/22/2015. Makino Botanical Garden.

 

Japan, Kochi. Apr/22/2015. Katsurahama beach.

 

Japan, Kochi. Apr/22/2015. Katsurahama beach.

 

Japan, Kochi. Apr/22/2015. Katsurahama beach.

 

Japan, Kochi. Apr/22/2015. Katsurahama beach.

 

Japan, Kochi. Apr/22/2015. Katsurahama beach.

 

Japan, Kochi. Apr/22/2015. Katsurahama beach.

 

Japan, Kochi. Apr/22/2015. Katsurahama beach.

 

Japan, Kochi. Apr/22/2015. Katsurahama beach.

 

Japan, Kochi. Apr/22/2015. Katsurahama beach.

 

Japan, Kochi. Apr/23/2015. Sugi no Osugi.

 

Japan, Kochi. Apr/23/2015. Sugi no Osugi.

 

Japan, Kochi. Apr/23/2015. Sugi no Osugi.

 

Japan, Kochi. Apr/23/2015. Sugi no Osugi.

 

Japan, Kochi. Apr/23/2015.

 

Japan, Kochi. Apr/23/2015.

 

Japan, Kochi. Apr/23/2015.

 

Japan, Kochi. Apr/23/2015.

 

Japan, Kochi. Apr/24/2015. Sakamoto Ryoma Memorial Museum.

 

Japan, Kochi. Apr/24/2015. Sakamoto Ryoma Memorial Museum.

 

Japan, Kochi. Apr/24/2015. Sakamoto Ryoma Memorial Museum.

 

Japan, Kochi. Apr/25/2015.

 

 

Japan, Kumagaya. Apr/27/2015.

 

Japan, Kochi. Apr/25/2015.

 

Karnak Hypostyle Hall

UofM_GKHHP_workshots_060413_OMM2604

 

Introduction & A Brief History:

 

The University of Memphis’s Karnak Great Hypostyle Hall Project (KGHHP) is a collaborative effort between Egyptian, American, French & Canadian research teams funded by grants from the The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRCC) and the American Research Center in Egypt (ARCE).

 

Karnak’s Hypostyle Hall columns and their inscriptions have been known about since antiquity and recorded many times over, however an exact epigraphic survey and publication of the scenes in their entirety has as of yet, not been successfully undertaken. This is due in large part to the difficulty of photographing columns without distortion. As you can imagine, taking photographs of curved objects and then flattening them is difficult!

 

In 2008, French laser scan data sets, know-how, and programs allowed the first real survey attempts, and members of a CFTEEK team successfully photographed all of the columns for conservation purposes. Unfortunately the quality of the photographs prevented them from being used for epigraphy.

 

The KGHHP column photography uses technology developed by Institut Géographique National (IGN) cartographer Yves Egels, with the assistance of Centre National de la Recherché Scientifique (CNRS) member Emmanuel Larose. As a former ARCE photographer, I bring a photographic knowledge set and experience to take as well-lit, high resolution photographs as possible. Combined with Yves’s technology the results are pretty incredible: photogrammetrically accurate photo-déroules of the columns with pixel to millimetre accuracy.

 

col_73

 

Although a few of the columns will be photographed in entirety, the most important and unique parts are the scenes inscribed on them from the reigns of Seti I, Ramses II and Ramses IV. If you’re visiting this site following the information board QR code this is what you have seen (or are watching) me do. After all of the photographs of these scenes have been taken and processed they will serve as the foundation for an accurate epigraphic survey. They will published both in print and online and available for research purposes via Peter Brand at the University of Memphis and Jean Revez at the University of Quebec in Montreal (UQAM). They will also be published in a coffee table book and as a series of limited edition prints.

 

A Few Facts:

 

• Our work wouldn’t be possible without the permission and help of the Egyptian Ministry State of Antiquities (MSA), director of Karnak Temple, Abdel Laziz, and a cadre of Karnak inspectors: Peter, Bahaa, Wahlid, Mahmoud & Haggag.

 

• I have a crew of 6 dedicated workers with experience in Karnak Temple: Raiese Mahmoud, Haggag, Mahmoud, Hassani, Hamada and Farouk. Without their help I wouldn’t be able to photography anything!

 

• There were originally 134 columns in the Hypostyle Hall. Of those, 3 are missing and 2 have been destroyed to their bases leaving 129 columns in total.

 

• There are 12 large columns standing 29 m (96 ft) tall, and 117 small columns standing 13.5 m (45 ft) tall.

 

• The large columns are roughly 10 m (32ft) in circumference, and the small columns are roughly 8 m (26 ft) in circumference.

 

• Each column typically has three scenes inscribed from the reigns of Seti I, Ramses II and Ramses IV. However, not all columns are complete!

 

• In total there are 286 small column, and 36 large column scenes. Currently 174 small column scenes have been photographed. (*Note: As of Mar/30/2015, all 286 small column scenes have been photographed.)

 

• Rectification is the process of removing distortion and flattening the photos on a 2-Dimensional plane while retaining their proper proportions.

 

Methodology:

 

In order to photograph the columns completely they are divided into 16 segments or points. A series of 7 photographs in a row from the top to the bottom of each scene is taken from each of the 16 points. On the small columns 8 metres in circumference this means every 1/2 metre. The photographs have roughly 1/3 to 1/2 overlap between them and are taken as flush to the column as possible. Because of the power of the rectification software they are taken handheld, allowing for quick movement.

 

79_sketch_1_OMM1397

 

An aluminum scaffolding array of 4 levels on wheels is aligned to each of the 16 points and levelled to the column. The scaffolding plank is lowered incrementally to match the position of each of the 7 photos in the row. Large pieces of frosted plastic are hung from the back and sides of the scaffolding and used to diffuse direct sunlight. This creates the atmosphere of a giant lightbox which helps light the columns in addition to a photo studio strobe light.

 

SONY DSC

 

The photographs are taken with a professional DSLR, using a fixed 28mm lens. In order to photograph the column scenes with even lighting, a studio strobe fired through a lightbox is placed a 1/2 meter above the top of each scene. The intensity (wattage) of the strobe is adjusted to maintain as even as lighting as possible for each photograph in the row.

 

SONY DSC

 

After the photographs have been uploaded and adjusted, they are exported as high resolution jpegs. These jpegs are assembled using programs written by Yves Egels to specifically rectify and align each of 112 photographs into one photogrammetrically accurate photo-déroule of the entire column. More information on this process can be found on Yves’s blog and via the Ecole Nationale des Sciences Géographiques publication, Close-range Photogrammetry for Architecture. The rectified and properly aligned photographs are then merged and blended together and exported as a high resolution tiff file. The tiff file is level-adjusted and checked for epigraphic and photographic (lighting) consistency.

 

A Few More Facts:

 

• Each small column has 112 individual photographs blended together to make one entire déroule of that column.

 

• It takes roughly 10 minutes per point to adjust the scaffolding and take the photographs for that point, so each column takes roughly 2.5 hrs to photograph.

 

• In one day, I can generally photograph 2 small columns.

 

What’s Next?

 

Though I haven’t had the opportunity to photograph the large column scenes that’s soon to follow. Tests will be done at the end of this season and with any luck, next season will be devoted to their photography.

 

For more information about the Karnak Great Hypostyle Hall Project, the history of the hypostyle hall and epigraphic documentation click here.

 

Print

A Manitoba Summer

Canada, Manitoba. June/30/2013.

 

Canada, Manitoba. June/30/2013.

 

Canada, Manitoba. June/30/2013.

 

Canada, Hodgson, Manitoba. July/01/2013.

 

Canada, Hodgson, Manitoba. July/01/2013.

 

Canada, Hodgson, Manitoba. July/01/2013.

 

Canada, Hodgson, Manitoba. July/01/2013.

 

Canada, Hodgson, Manitoba. July/01/2013.

 

Canada, Hodgson, Manitoba. July/01/2013.

 

Canada, Lake Winnipeg, Manitoba. July/01/2013.

 

Canada, Lake Winnipeg, Manitoba. July/01/2013.

 

Canada, Lake Winnipeg, Manitoba. July/01/2013.

 

Canada, Lake Winnipeg, Manitoba. July/01/2013.

 

Canada, Lake Winnipeg, Manitoba. July/01/2013.

 

Canada, Lake Winnipeg, Manitoba. July/01/2013.

 

Canada, Hodgson, Manitoba. July/01/2013.

 

Canada, Hodgson, Manitoba. July/01/2013.

 

Canada, Hodgson, Manitoba. July/01/2013.

 

Canada, Hodgson, Manitoba. July/01/2013.

 

Canada, Lake Winnipeg, Manitoba. July/21/2013.

 

Canada, Lake Winnipeg, Manitoba. July/21/2013.

 

Canada, Lake Winnipeg, Manitoba. July/21/2013.

 

Canada, Lake Winnipeg, Manitoba. July/21/2013.

 

Canada, Lake Winnipeg, Manitoba. July/21/2013.

 

Canada, Lake Winnipeg, Manitoba. July/21/2013.

 

Canada, Hodgson, Manitoba. July/03/2013.

 

Canada, Hodgson, Manitoba. July/03/2013.

 

Canada, Hodgson, Manitoba. July/03/2013.

 

Canada, Hodgson, Manitoba. July/04/2013.

 

Canada, Hodgson, Manitoba. July/04/2013.

On the Campaign Trail

 

In the recent YEG civic election I threw as much of my visual weight behind Don Iveson’s campaign as possible. Although I approached the shots from a photojournalist perspective, my goals were anything but impartial — I wanted to see Don succeed in his bid to lead Edmonton over the next four years.

 

Along with photographer Tom Young, I documented the Iveson campaign over an intensive 3-month period (August – October 2013). The following photos come from 28 stops along the campaign trail engaging with Edmontonians both young and old, across a range of ethnicities and socio-economic stratums: from Heritage Days to coffee shops and doorsteps through to mayoral forums, community gardens and election night.

 

Much has been made of the cadre of amazing volunteers and politically astute campaign team, tactics and technology that facilitated Don’s bid for mayor. Engagement was the name of the game. But the results on election night speak not only to an extremely well-organized, well-run, positive campaign, but to all of us as Edmontontians. The stage has been set, and I’m curious and hopeful of where we will go. In the same way that these photos speak to Don’s successful campaign bid, over the coming years I’m looking forward to documenting how this city grows, engages and moves.

 

It’s not just about benefitting the top 10% and maintaining the status quo, it’s about building positive, engaged communities that talk and listen to one another — whether these be communities of neighbours living next to one another, or those of business, industry, education, health and technology that drive our economy. It’s about honouring consensus and pluralism; truly core Canadian values that have both given, and in return, will give us, an ability to adapt to the challenges that lay ahead. It’s about demonstrating and championing these values to the world, and this will take all of us, trying to build something, together.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tracy & Rob’s Wedding

 

Tracy & Rob met at Edmonton’s Panther Gym. The rest is history.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Green Fields

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lilia’s First…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Whyte Life

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The New Year

 

Photos from the 2013 New Year welcomed in in Canmore, AB.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mercury Opera

 

Photos from OMNI Televison’s documentary premiere of Mercury Opera’s 104 Underground. Hosted at the Stanley A. Milner Library Theatre and Latitude 53.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Swing n’ Skate

 

Photos from the Edmonton Arts Council Sunday Swing n’ Skate with the River City Big Band at City Hall.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

YEG Winter

 

Winter skating at Edmonton’s Victoria Park Oval.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Black, White & Western II

 

Photography from Egypt’s Black, White and Western Deserts with stops in Bahariya and Farafara. May 24 – 28th, 2012.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Black, White & Western I

 

Photography from Egypt’s Black, White and Western Deserts with stops in Bahariya and Farafara. May 24 – 28th, 2012.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kootenay

 

Canoeing the Kootenay River with Lachlin McKinnon: MacLeod Meadows – Canal Flats. Aug 17 – 19th, 2012.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Red Deer River

 

Canoeing the Red Deer River with Lachlin Mckinnon: Content Bridge (Highway 21) – Drumheller. Aug 12 – 14th, 2011.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ancient Merv

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

THE LOST OASIS OF TURKMENISTAN: ANCIENT MERV & THE SILK TRADE ROUTES – 2007

 

Relic or Ruin?

The Lonely Planet describes Turkmenistan as “a lunar landscape with craters of cultural activity… resembling an Arab Gulf State without the money”. The city of Merv is detailed as, “a lumpen landscape, scarred with ditches and channels, grazed by camels and dotted every now and then with an earthwork mound or a battered sandy-brick structure.” In contrast. The Bradt travel guide, written by former British Ambassador Paul Brummell, introduces Turkmenistan as “a remarkable place,” and Ancient Merv as “one of the most important oasis cities of the Silk Road… among the major archaeological sites of Central Asia.” But two’s a tie, so who better to turn to than former Merv resident and13th century Islamic geographer Yaqut, who remarked, “verily but for the Mongols I would have stayed and lived and died there [Merv]. Hardly could I tear myself away.” Perhaps there’s credence in both guidebook descriptions; Turkmenistan – and Merv in particular, it would seem – has seen its share of turmoil. Indeed, for a country less than 16 years old, host to this intriguing city with a 2,500-year history, one could expect nothing less.

 

An old republic under the Soviet regime until the breakup of the USSR in 1991, Turkmen-i-stan – literally, place of the Turkmen – has seen scores of empires, as can be traced through the archaeological record at Merv. At times a fortress citadel-outpost, at others a capital and administrative centre, Merv’s form and function has waxed and waned through the centuries. Military strong post at the frontier of major campaigns, capital to empires, revolutionary staging ground, independent city-state – Merv has seen it all.

 

A Brief History
With an empire stretching from Turkey to India, and Central Asia to Egypt, Achaemenians – the first royal dynasty of Persia unified under Cyrus the Great in 6th Century B.C. – were also the first to develop a significant military and trading presence at Merv. Alexander the Great swept through the region en route to the Oxus (Amu Dayra) and India, but upon premature death, his short-lived empire’s eastern territories soon became part of the Seleucid Dynasty. A loosely linked Parthian Empire followed next, overthrown by the Sassanians in 226 A.D, who ruled for a period of roughly 400 years until the arrival of Islam in the form of Arab armies circa 651. Rising to prominence as an eastern capital under the Seljuk Empire, Merv grew to be one of the largest cities in the world, encompassing 550 ha. In 1221, rumour holds that Mongol armies circled the outer defenses for six days looking for a weak point before negotiating entrance, only to ransack and burn the entire city while slaughtering it’s citizens – tribute to a gruesome feud-gone-wrong between Khwarizmshah Mohammed and Genghis Khan. Timurid influence saw the city of Abdullah-Khan Kala built south of the ruins in 1409, and in the 16th century, Uzbek Turks ruling from Bukhara took control of the city before it was incorporated into the Persian Empire of the Safavids up until the 1730’s. In the mid-19th century, Merv gained independence from the Qajar rulers of Iran and became an autonomous state, minting it’s own currency, but in 1890, the city, along with much of modern-day Turkmenistan, was conquered by the Russians – a strategic maneuver played out in the “Great Game” of colonial expansion into Central Asia. Russian archaeological interest in the area was maintained after WW II, but collective farms soon encroached on former city suburbs, and parts of Merv were used for military training and artillery firing grounds. Perhaps the Mongols are not the only ones to blame for Merv’s pockmarked appearance. To this day, there is still a small, if not somewhat forlorn, military base maintained by two soldiers and a rather over-zealous dog – remnants of a helicopter base that launched Soviet assaults into Afghanistan throughout the 1980’s.

 

Urban Archaeology
As Canadian archaeologist Tish Prouse can attest, a surface glance at Merv may seem to fit the Lonely Planet description, but under, and often inside, the lumpen landscape, myriad stories lie waiting to be revealed.

 

“What appear as lumps, depressions, rubble – under those lie buildings, industrial complexes, mausoleums, minarets, streets, markets, houses, you name it – it’s even rumored one of the first Islamic observatories is out here somewhere.”

 

While completing a Masters in Archaeology at The University College of London, Prouse became involved with the Ancient Merv Archaeological Project, and for the past three years has excavated on-site at the North gate of Sultan Kala. But even though the British-lead team has worked in conjunction with Turkmen authorities since 1992, the amount of archaeology remaining at Merv is mind-boggling.

 

“ To get an idea of how cities and urban populations interacted with each other, in and of themselves along the silk roads – you have my team, who have been excavating for three seasons using proper recording methods and accurate documentation of finds – and we’ve done 5mx3mx6m. The site is 11.5 km2 – and that’s just the city proper – it doesn’t include the outer lying subdivisions north and south, or the nearest waypost 5km out. The whole oasis is dotted with little things that survived from the hub of this city. If the funds were available, you could employ 10 000 separate teams, with a core of 20 workers all doing their own section, and they wouldn’t get in each-others way! “

 

With UNESCO World Heritage status for Merv in 1999 came a push for the preservation and protection of existing mud-brick structures. The conservation efforts also called for proper practices and the cleaning up of numerous trenches left open to erosion. Scars in the landscape, it seems, can also be attributed to hurried excavations, improperly documented with little or no time spent back-filling; in short, find-oriented archaeologists whose vision was caught up in the details, without understanding the bigger picture. Prouse’s current excavation is of the remedial kind, properly recording archaeological data in a trench dug with a bulldozer, then left open to slump with wind and rain.

 

“The Soviets had great training as far as history and well-rounded approaches, but unfortunately there was negligence in keeping important parts of the site up to an acceptable standard. There were problems ensuring artifacts were from the right levels, or, for that matter, that they were present after the dig, and a discrepancy in taking care of things valued as prize items, such as gold pieces, versus things that weren’t valued as items of any interest, such as animal bones. Depending on what questions one is answering, all of this information is very important. With archaeology under the old Soviet regime the focus on finding ‘stuff’ outweighed understanding what was there. They weren’t treasure hunters per se, they were finding out lots of things about pottery and stratigraphy, but at the end of the day – if they didn’t find anything of ‘value’ – then they didn’t have a very good archaeological excavation.”

 

A quick jaunt through the stratigraphy of the North Gate trench reveals some intriguing tales. Five or six packed mud-earth projectiles in the vicinity of a collapsed wall support historical accounts of a Mongol sacking. So does the distinct burn layer that runs beneath the wall, and the skeletal remains of an old woman with two juveniles trapped below. Further down, the sequential interplay of fired and mud brick suggest a city in constant flux; buildings buttressed and adjoined in some sections, only to be knocked down and rebuilt in others. But the most interesting aspect of Prouse’s trench lies in a canal system and series of pipes discovered over the past two field seasons.

 

“What you’ve got is an amazing system of pipes which twist and lock together, fitted with resin to keep water from seeping out of the seams. Not only that, but the clay itself is ridiculously solid, so even when it’s buried and under pressure, it still functions properly. These locking systems are incredibly similar to what we use with modern pvc tubing, sealed to maintain air pressure – even with a minimal amount of water the same pressure is maintained in these 1000-year-old clay pipes and they won’t cave in.”

 

What this indicates is a sophisticated system of water management and regulation. Clean water was undoubtedly important to the practice of Islam, but the depth of the canal and certain pipe systems may pre-date Islamic occupation, and challenge currently held beliefs about who lived where, and when.

 

“Depending on who you talk to, and where you’re standing, this canal could be the main water conduit distributing water to the city, or the main conduit taking all the sludge out of the city,” explains Prouse.

 

“This is the first time at Merv we’ve uncovered a fully functional water management system, used over a period of time, that includes both fresh-water and sewage elements. It’s known the Romans had an amazing system of aquaducts and hydraulics which used pipes – not only clay pipes, but lead pipes – so a 1000 years before what we’ve uncovered here, it’s clear that in another part of the world there’s water pipes and technology. It’s nothing new, but what is new, is that this explains how the Turkic and Islamic dynasties ran this city – what ideas they had about providing fresh water and removing waste.”

 

A system of siphoning clean water to local neighborhoods? Sewage disposal networks? Whatever the function, the pipes and their relation to the canal leave many puzzles to be solved.

 

Prouse elaborates. “The more intensely one excavates and looks at the interaction of canals and architecture, one finds that over time, they in fact change function. At one point this was very clearly a fresh water canal, as evidenced by iron compounds on the side of the banks, indicative of algae growth when cleaning water from basic biological sludge. Later on, it’s a brick lined canal full of waste debris. In a period of 500 years, the canal system has changed, and with that change, one finds a whole series of different architectural components: a change in pipe systems, their size, quality and construction, as well as the construction of the canal – mud bank versus brick lined. “

 

The True Treasure
Although mainstream media continues to cast-type archaeologists as action adventurers a la Indiana Jones, urban excavations of earth-fired pipe can prove just as alluring as a “Kingdom of Crystal Skulls.” The real treasure lies in understanding how a city was built and functioned, and that’s what Prouse’s ongoing excavations at the North Gate seek to contribute.

 

“I got into archaeology because of Indiana Jones, because I watched the Last Crusade,” quips Prouse.

 

“The first year in University when I started seriously studying archaeology my professor said the 3 things one must do to become a good archaeologist were: get a good hat, show an appreciation for scotch, and smoke high quality cigars while excavating! “

 

“What’s funny is that there are many archaeologists across the world that have views about what is, and what is not, an archaeologist – but Indiana Jones is a great way to bring something which many people find dull and drab into the forefront of an exciting lifestyle. The thing I enjoy about my job is that like Indiana Jones there is a certain amount of adventure. I’m thrown into situations where most normal people don’t go, I interact with locals on a different level, I explore places people haven’t seen in a 1000 years. But unlike Indiana Jones there is a serious aspect of academic research – one spends hours upon hours in the library researching and doing laboratory analysis. It can be a mundane process: teaching, researching, talking to colleagues, documenting evidence – it’s not just walking into a temple and taking out the long lost relic. One has to record as much information as possible so that other scholars can come back to the same place and use your evidence to draw new research insights into how humanities evolved and functioned.”

 

With an open trench to finish the following season, and an abundance of areas left to record, fill and explore on-site, Prouse hopes to return in future seasons, discovering more about the canal systems at play in Ancient Merv, and spreading light on one of Turkmenistan’s archaeological jewels.

 

Ben & Kim’s Wedding

 

Photos from Ben & Kim’s wedding weekend! June/28 – July/01 2012.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tod

 

Photos from a housing development project south of Luxor in Tod. This is a bit of an unique take on housing development as much of the low-cost housing in Upper Egypt leans towards multistory apartment flats. These houses were designed by Mamdouh Hamza of Hamza Associates and are intended as starter units that provide ample space and facilities, while making use of prevailing winds to cool the interior. Built by Mohammed Salem, who happens to live across the street, and who invited me out to take a few photos.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Elisabeth & Ryan’s Wedding

 

This summer I also had the pleasure of photographing Elisabeth & Ryan’s big day. A great wedding to shoot from start to finish!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Adam & Vicky’s Wedding

 

This summer I had the pleasure of photographing Adam & Vicky’s wedding. They had a great celebration and it was a lot of fun to shoot!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gokoku Shrine

 

Japan, Toyama. July/2006.

 

Twilight at Gokoku shrine in Isobe-machi. Lanterns designed by local community members are lit just before a fireworks display commemorating the most intensive night of firebombing during WWII.

 

 

 

 

 

Little Limestone Lake II

 

Did you know Manitoba was home to Canada’s Caribbean? Neither did I. Day one and an explanation of this amazing marl lake here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Little Limestone Lake I

 

Little Limestone Lake is considered to be one of the largest and most outstanding examples of a marl lake in the world. Located just north of Grand Rapids in the Manitoba Lowlands, Little Limestone derives its name from the unique karst (limestone) geology of the surrounding region. The colour of the lake changes visibly as calcite in the water reacts chemically to the heat of the sun.

 

Little Limestone recently became Manitoba’s 85th protected park reserve with the Mosakahiken Cree Nation taking an active stewardship role in its future as outlined in this memorandum of understanding.

 

At